Saturday, May 6, 2017

Published Corn Allergy Studies/Statistics

"Maize food allergy: a double-blind placebo-controlled study." Journal of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 38:12 2008 Dec pg 1943-9:

Important excerpts:

"The number of studies that address IgE mediated maize allergy is all too few."

"Maize is a cause of IgE-mediated allergic reactions to foods in adults and children. Nearly half of the subjects recruited were confirmed by challenge to be allergic to maize. Twenty-three percent of the positive challenge patients manifested symptoms that involved two organ systems, thus fulfilling the criteria for maize induced anaphylaxis. Maize is allergenic and can pose a risk for symptomatic food allergy at a dose of 100 mg."


"Maize/Corn," Thermo Scientific, 2012

Important Excerpts:

 "Zea m 14, a lipid transfer protein, has also been isolated from Maize flour. Skin reactivity and IgE antibodies to this allergen were detected in 19 of 22 patients (86%) with systemic symptoms following the ingestion of Maize, confirming this as the Maize major allergen . . ."

"IgE-mediated reactions
Maize may moderately often sensitise or induce symptoms of food allergy in sensitised individuals (7,15,31,34-37). Allergic symptoms reported have included abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, rhinitis, asthma, angioedema, atopic dermatitis, and anaphylaxis."

"Maize has been implicated as one of the causative foods of eosinophilic esophagitis, a disorder with symptoms suggestive of gastroesophageal reflux disease but unresponsive to conventional reflux therapies (58)."


"Double-blind, placebo-controlled corn challenge resulting in anaphylaxis," The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, April, 2001, Volume 107, Issue 4, Page 744


"Maize pollen is an important allergen in occupationally exposed workers," J Occup Med Toxicol, 2011; 6:32, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health


“Corn Maize Gluten Causes Antibody Response in Celiac Patients,” Dr. Peter Osborne, Gluten Free Society, Clin Chim Acta. 1991 Dec 31;204(1-3):109-22


"IgE-mediated allergy to corn: a 50 kDa protein, belonging to the Reduced Soluble Proteins, is a major allergen." Pasini G et al. IgE-mediated allergy to corn: a 50 kDa protein, belonging to the Reduced Soluble Proteins, is a major allergen. Allergy. 2002 Feb;57(2):98-106


"Maize food allergy: lipid-transfer proteins, endochitinases, and alpha-zein precursor are relevant maize allergens in double-blind placebo-controlled maize-challenge-positive patients." Pastorello EA et al. Maize food allergy: lipid-transfer proteins, endochitinases, and alpha-zein precursor are relevant maize allergens in double-blind placebo-controlled maize-challenge-positive patients. Anal Bioanal Chem. 2009 Sep;395(1):93-102.
 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19669736



RACIAL DIFFERENCES IN FOOD ALLERGY PHENOTYPE AND HEALTH CARE UTILIZATION AMONG US CHILDREN, Published online: November 22, 2016, American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI)
"In a study published in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice, Mahdavinia and colleagues conducted a large, retrospective cohort study of children ages 0 to 17 years with food allergy seen in Allergy/Immunology clinics at two urban tertiary care centers in the US. The objective of this study was to characterize disease phenotypes and disparities in healthcare utilization among African-American (AA), Hispanic, and White children with food allergy.

“The cohort of 817 children was composed of 35% AA, 12% Hispanic, and 53% non-Hispanic Whites. Compared with non-Hispanic White children, AA children had significantly higher rates of having asthma and eczema, and significantly higher rates of allergy to wheat, soy, corn (emphasis added), fish and shellfish. Hispanic children had significantly higher rates of allergy to corn (emphasis added), fish and shellfish, and higher rates of having eczema, but similar rate of asthma. There was a significant difference in insurance type by race/ethnicity with 55%, 18%, and 11% of AA, Hispanic, and White children covered by Medicaid, respectively. Compared with Whites, AA and Hispanic children had shorter duration of follow up for FA with allergy specialist and higher rates of FA-related anaphylaxis and ER visits."


Corn allergy more prevalent than rice and peanut allergies?
"Furthermore, corn allergy, rice allergy and peanut allergy were 1.02, 0.87 and 0.73 %, respectively."
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4980862/#Sec8title

". . . cornstarch can act as an ingestant allergen, rather to the surprise of the investigating physicians." (emphasis added)
Mary Hewitt Loveless, Allergy for Corn and Its Derivatives, The Journal of Allergy, [date unknown], 500-509
https://www.jacionline.org/article/0021-8707(50)90098-0/pdf?fbclid=IwAR3EbWiTPA_71WQSeKBQGFpY2AyUVToDqobQUeOnHuD9vOrpA1odYjfGLpM


Corn Allergy Statistics (Monthly)
https://cornallergyadvocacyresources.blogspot.com/2017/04/corn-allergy-statistics-monthly.html


Diane H., Corn Allergy Advocate
Corn Allergy Advocacy/Resources
@CornAllergy911

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