Sunday, September 29, 2019

September, 2019, Month-End Corn Allergy Statistics


In one corn allergy group of 9,394 members (170* of whom are anaphylactic to corn), there has been an 839.4% increase in corn allergies in the last 75 months, with an average of 111.9 new members/month.

*Poll taken in May, 2017:  Members prescribed epinephrine auto-injector pens as a result of their allergy to corn.


Corn Allergy Symptoms:
American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology

WebMD

Healthline


Corn products/derivatives to avoid if you are allergic to corn


Data Collection Methods:



Diane H., Corn Allergy Advocate
Corn Allergy Advocacy/Resources
@CornAllergy911


Source:
“Corn Allergy,” Wikipedia
“External Links: Corn Allergy and Intolerance Online support group for corn allergy and intolerance.”

Saturday, September 21, 2019

Ronzoni® Organic Penne Rigate Failed Oral Challenge


WARNING:
I strongly recommend that you do not attempt any oral food challenges unless you are in the presence of your physician.  Although I have not yet experienced an anaphylactic reaction to corn, I do have epinephrine auto-injector pens available (prescribed for my allergy to most antibiotics and petroleum/petrolatum).

            Since corn is exempt from FDA labeling requirements, anyone allergic to corn must first contact manufacturers to inquire if their products contain corn-derived ingredients.  I have not been able to find any safe-for-me pasta since my corn allergy diagnosis in 2011, which I believe is due to corn cross-contact which can occur through the many stages of shipping, processing, handling, and packaging.

            Even though this was a failed oral challenge, which I believe was the result of corn cross-contact; I want to extend my heartfelt appreciation to Ronzoni® for their extraordinary efforts on my behalf prior to conducting my oral challenge. They were extremely patient and forthcoming in answering all of my inquiries. If I did not have an allergy to corn, I would gladly purchase their products.

            Since I am not allergic to wheat or eggs, I conducted an oral challenge of Ronzoni® Organic Penne Rigate pasta on September 20, 2019.  Prior to consuming this pasta, I had fasted for 12 hours due to fasting labs earlier in the morning, so this guaranteed that my oral challenge would not involve any other food product that may have been cross-contacted by corn.  Sadly, I have deemed this product as unsafe for me; and I would advise anyone with a corn allergy to use extreme caution in trialing this pasta.

Ronzoni® Organic Penne Rigate
Non-GMO Project Verified
USDA Organic
Certified Organic by ECOCERT ICO
UPC 071300055571
Best if Used By Date:  AUG3121
Product Code: VAR08 16

            12:25 pm:  After cooking ¼ box of this pasta in 2 quarts of double-filtered tap water with safe-for-me Himalayan (non-iodized) sea salt, I consumed one-half of this cooked pasta, seasoning it with safe-for-me butter and sea salt.

            12:55 pm:  My corn allergy reaction began with pounding heart, elevated pulse rate, severe abdominal swelling (“corn baby”), and overall discomfort (my normal reactions to corn ingestion).  My resting pulse rate is normally 60 bpm, and registered at 92 bpm (confirmed with “Pulse Oximeter”) even though I was resting during this period.

            2:15 pm:  I took an antihistamine, since my symptoms were escalating. 

            2:40 pm:  Pulse rate was 96 bpm.

            5:30 pm:  My allergic reactions ceased.


Diane H., Corn Allergy Advocate
Corn Allergy Advocacy/Resources
@CornAllergy911


“AVOIDING CROSS-CONTACT,” FARE



Friday, August 30, 2019

August, 2019, Month-End Corn Allergy Statistics


In one corn allergy group of 9,333 members (170* of whom are anaphylactic to corn), there has been an 833.3% increase in corn allergies in the last 74 months, with an average of 112.6 new members/month.

*Poll taken in May, 2017:  Members prescribed epinephrine auto-injector pens as a result of their allergy to corn.


Corn Allergy Symptoms:
American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology

WebMD

Healthline


Corn products/derivatives to avoid if you are allergic to corn


Data Collection Methods:



Diane H., Corn Allergy Advocate
Corn Allergy Advocacy/Resources
@CornAllergy911


Source:
“Corn Allergy,” Wikipedia
“External Links: Corn Allergy and Intolerance Online support group for corn allergy and intolerance.”



Wednesday, August 28, 2019

Corn Allergy for Newbies


            The most important thing you need to know is that corn is ubiquitous and is currently EXEMPT from FDA labeling requirements.  A person can be ingestion-reactive, contact-reactive, and inhalation-reactive to corn, so extreme care must be exercised in navigating this devastating allergy.

            The rule of thumb is if you don't make it from scratch, don't eat it (I haven't eaten at a restaurant since my diagnosis in 2011). We can eat very few processed foods and no commercially-processed, non-organic meat, poultry, seafood, fruits, or produce due to FDA-mandated corn-derived acid washes.

            All fresh foods must be organic, and then you need to soak them for 10-15 minutes in a bath of cold filtered water (tap water may contain corn), Bragg's apple cider vinegar (in the U.S. white vinegar is derived from corn), and baking soda to cleanse off any corn due to cross-contamination which can occur through the many stages of shipping, processing, handling, and packaging.  I even put my organic chicken through this process because the absorbent pads under the chicken are "corny."

            You may have to have your medications, vitamins, and supplements compounded to exclude corn, since corn-derived ingredients are used as a common filler.  In addition, you may have to install a water purification system; since tap water may also be contaminated due to corn-derived purification chemicals.

Reprinted with permission by M.R., Wausau, WI:
            “My corn allergic son (F.R.) cannot tolerate ingesting any bottled water or tap water. We had to purchase a ProPur Nomad with G2 filters. All food preparation and cooking or any oral contact (oral hygiene) has to be used with this safe water. I am breastfeeding him and I cannot ingest any other source of water either. We also use a ProPur shower head filter for showering/bath due to his open skin/sores with eczema (reaction to corn).   Anytime we travel, we have to take both filters with us.”

Hospitalization with an allergy to corn:
            If you are hospitalized, you will have to provide your own previously-prepared corn-free foods, fluids, and medications; since hospitals are not equipped to treat or nourish corn-allergic patients.   The ONLY guaranteed corn-free product on hospital premises is straight saline-only IV fluid.

            You should print out the following documents and keep them with you at all times in the event of hospitalization.  After reading numerous testimonies documenting that many physicians insisted upon administering dextrose IV fluids to corn-allergic patients in direct violation of the product information sheet, I spent the next three years forwarding this critical information to our nation’s hospitals, and colleges of medicine and pharmacy. 

Baxter Labs specifically warns about administering dextrose IV fluids to corn-allergic patients.
 "Solutions containing dextrose should be used with caution, if at all, in patients with known allergy to corn or corn products." - Page 3

BCPharmacists, "Warning: corn-related allergens . . ."

"Probable anaphylactic reaction to corn-derived dextrose solution."


Corn Allergy Resources:

Corn Allergy References, Studies, Statistics, & Petitions
(Includes my submission to The Joint Commission, Congress, FDA, & U.S. Dept. of Health requesting emergency mandate that hospitals stock corn-free foods, liquids, & drugs.)

United States Hospitals/Health Systems Contacted Re: Protocol for Treating Corn-Allergic Patients

Corn products/derivatives to avoid if you are allergic to corn

"Corn: It's Everything," Iowa Corn


Diane H., Corn Allergy Advocate
Corn Allergy Advocacy/Resources
@CornAllergy911

Monday, August 26, 2019

Oral Challenge of Beech-Nut® Naturals Baby Food

WARNING:
I strongly recommend that you do not attempt any oral food challenges unless you are in the presence of your physician.  Although I have not yet experienced an anaphylactic reaction to corn, I do have epinephrine auto-injector pens available (prescribed for my allergy to most antibiotics and petroleum/petrolatum).

Good News:  I just trialed two new products today, August 26, 2019, and survived without any reaction.  My main concern was whether or not waxed-coated apples [1] were used in the processing due to my anaphylactic allergy to petroleum (most of these wax coatings are not only corn-based, but also petroleum-based).  I called the company before trialing, and they assured me these should be safe for me.

Bad News:  It's baby food!  But I'm going to be stocking up, because it's another off-the-shelf food that I can eat especially during hospitalization,
[2] traveling,  power outage, natural disaster, etc. (no refrigeration required).  I can also use these foods, when necessary, to get back to baseline.  In addition, they're delicious and nutritious!

At 12:15 pm, I trialed Beech-Nut Naturals Just Pears (Non-GMO Project Verified, 4 oz., UPC 052200171042).  If they contained corn, I would have reacted within 20 minutes.  If they contained petroleum, I would have reacted within 30 minutes (acute asthma which lasts for three days).  This product is "safe for me."

At 1:35 pm, I trialed Beech-Nut Naturals Just Sweet Potatoes (Non-GMO Project Verified, 4 oz., UPC 052200171028).  Again, no reaction; therefore, this product is "safe for me."

They also offer organic products; however, since I didn't react to these, I don't want to spend the extra $$$ to purchase organic.

Since we can consume very few processed foods, and no commercially processed non-organic meat, poultry, seafood, fruit, or produce due to FDA-mandated corn-derived acid washes; it appears we've been reduced to eating baby food for our guaranteed safety.  


Diane H., Corn Allergy Advocate
Corn Allergy Advocacy/Resources
@CornAllergy911


References:

[1] Undeclared petroleum in Martinelli's Gold Medal® Unfiltered Apple Juice

UPC 041244001545
Product Code: 16:37E
Best By Date:  Jan 15, 2021

My most dangerous physician-confirmed allergy is to petroleum/petrolatum (acute asthma which takes 3 days for the petroleum to be eliminated from my system). As a result, I cannot consume any fruits or produce with petroleum-based wax coating. Even when I wash the wax off, the petroleum permeates the skin into the meat. On June 2, 2019, I consumed Martinelli's unfiltered apple juice, and suffered a severe asthma episode requiring antihistamine and steroid (the episode lasted for three days). When I contacted their company this afternoon, they indicated that occasionally they process petroleum-based wax-coated apples to manufacture this juice.

6/4/19 - Filed complaint with the California Department of Health.
6/5/19 - Filed complaint with the FDA
6/5/19 - Filed complaint with Walmart Corporate Office, 479-273-4000

[2] My February 25, 2018, certified letter to the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Re: mandate that hospitals stock corn-free foods, fluids, & drugs for the safety of corn-allergic patients.

Wednesday, August 21, 2019

Anaphylactic Reaction from Licking Envelopes (Corn-Derived Glue)


            In our online corn allergy support groups of over 11K members, there have been many reports of allergic reactions after licking envelopes.  According to the Envelope Manufacturing Association, “envelope adhesive these days is made from corn.”  An anaphylactic reaction after licking corn-derived envelope glue was recently reported in one corn allergy group.

Reprinted with permission by S.D., greater Boston area:
            "I just want to warn others not to lick envelopes. After licking 60+ envelopes at work my throat started to close up. I then looked up the ingredients.  I did not even think to worry about corn in the envelope. The sudden onset of this allergy is eye opening and quite frankly scary since I’ve never dealt with anaphylaxis before."

            Since corn allergies have increased by 820.2% in the last 73 months, we may read more reports of reactions to many of the products outlined in the following article.  According to Iowa Corn, these are just a few of the products manufactured with corn; therefore, if corn were declared an official allergen subject to FDA labeling requirements, nearly everything on our planet would require a corn allergy warning.

INDUSTRIAL STARCH USES
Paper, recycled paper
Cardboard
Textiles
Glues and adhesives
Batteries
Bookbinding
Cleaners, detergents
Coatings on paper, wood and metal
Color carrier for printing
Crayons and Chalk
Dyes
Fireworks
Industrial filters and water recovery
Lubricants
Ore and oil refining
Paints
Plastics
Rubber tires
Surgical dressings
Wallboard and wallpaper




Diane H., Corn Allergy Advocate
Corn Allergy Advocacy/Resources
@CornAllergy911


References:

July, 2019, Month-End Corn Allergy Statistics: 820.2% Increase in 73 Months
(Corn is ubiquitous and is EXEMPT from FDA labeling requirements.)

“Corn: It's Everything," Iowa Corn

“The lickable strip, which is called the gum, is usually dextrin-based adhesive, Benjamin said. Dextrin adhesives are made from potato or corn starches [emphasis added], which makes the glue safe to lick.” [Unless you are allergic to corn or potatoes.]
https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/539q73/why-is-licking-envelopes-still-a-thing

“. . . and in the U.S., lickable envelope glue is made from corn [emphasis added] . . .”

“The adhesive used on the flap of envelopes falls under the category of starch- and dextrin-based adhesives. Such adhesives can be made from a variety of starchy plant materials, including corn, potato, tapioca, sago, and—eek!—wheat. In practice, however, corn and potato are what’s actually used, as noted in the Envelope Manufacturers Association Foundation report, “Envelope Adhesives Technical Paper.” Its sister organization, the EMA, more specifically notes that envelope adhesive these days is made from corn [emphasis added], and is gluten-free.”

“Gum arabic is edible and safe.  Some envelope glue is made from petroleum-based chemicals as well, but these are also safe.” [Unless you are allergic to corn or petroleum (a toxic chemical).  I have physician-diagnosed allergies to both.]

“Signs You're Allergic to Petroleum”
“According to the Ecology Center, petroleum and its by-products can cause illnesses more serious than just allergies. The toxic effects of petroleum products on the human body have been linked to serious respiratory conditions, disruption of the endocrine system and developmental problems in infants exposed before birth. Some EPA studies also suggest the petroleum distillates in pesticides, sometimes ingested in food products, can be linked to some cancers and disturbances of the nervous and reproductive systems.”[emphasis added]

Corn Allergy References, Studies, & Statistics
(Includes my submission to The Joint Commission, Congress, FDA, & U.S. Dept. of Health requesting emergency mandate that hospitals stock corn-free foods, liquids, & drugs.)
https://cornallergyadvocacyresources.blogspot.com/2018/04/corn-allergy-reference-links.html


     

Tuesday, July 30, 2019

July, 2019, Month-End Corn Allergy Statistics


In one corn allergy group of 9,202 members (170* of whom are anaphylactic to corn), there has been an 820.2% increase in corn allergies in the last 73 months, with an average of 112.4 new members/month.

*Poll taken in May, 2017:  Members prescribed epinephrine auto-injector pens as a result of their allergy to corn.


Corn Allergy Symptoms:
American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology

WebMD

Healthline


Corn products/derivatives to avoid if you are allergic to corn


Data Collection Methods:



Diane H., Corn Allergy Advocate
Corn Allergy Advocacy/Resources
@CornAllergy911


Source:
“Corn Allergy,” Wikipedia
“External Links: Corn Allergy and Intolerance Online support group for corn allergy and intolerance.”